4 quick & easy tricks to work out site measurements for a fencing quote

Asking ‘How much does fencing cost?” is a little like asking “How long is a piece of string?”. The first step to getting a fencing quote usually requires some rough site measurements. Explore these 4 quick and easy ways to measure your site in just a few minutes!

4 Quick, Easy Ways To Measure Your Site | ModularWalls

1. Tape measure

The first one is pretty straightforward. If you have a tape measure, this will give you the most accurate results.

While this method is much easier with a friend, you can also enlist the help of a trusty rock to anchor the starting point in place while you extend the tape and get your readings!

However, if you’re not comfortable using a tape measure (or don’t even own one), you can also get some rough measurement estimates using the next 3 methods:

 

 

2. Pace it out

A simple way to get some estimate site measurements is to pace it out.

If you can  measure out a metre and then take a practice step using that measurement, it can improve the accuracy of your pacing. However, you can also simply estimate it by taking an extra wide step, as the average step is around 80cm.

Once you’re comfortable with the width of the pace, you can then pace out the length of your boundary, as in the video above.

4 Quick, Easy Ways To Measure Your Site | ModularWalls

3. Use your existing fence

If you’re replacing an existing fence, you can also use it to estimate the measurements for your new fencing quote.

Most fence posts are generally spaces between 1.8 or 2.4m apart. Simply measure or estimate post-to-post, to get a rough measurement for the ‘bay’ (a term for the part of the fencing between the posts). Then, calculate this measurement by the number of bays that boundary has.

For instance:

  • If you have a 1.8m post to post measurement, and there are 6 bays along that side of the fence, you’d end up with an estimate of 10.8m.
  • If you have a 2.4m post-to-post measurement, and there are 10 bays along that side of the fence, you’d end up with an estimate of 24m.

 

 

4. Use the Measure app on your smart phone

You got a smart phone? You got a measuring tape!

The Measure app is of many handy apps that can help with outdoor projects and gardening maintenance. Most smart phones now come with a built-in measuring app, making it even easier!

 

For short distances/lengths, or areas with a clear line of sight to the end point, you simply:

  • Open the app.
  • Point the camera down so that it faces the starting point.
  • Touch the ‘+’ button on the screen to add the starting point of your measurement; a small dot should appear on the screen.
  • Start moving the camera across the area you’re measuring; a thin line should appear as you move it.
  • When you reach the end of your measurement, touch the ‘+’ button on the screen again to add the end point; a small dot should appear at the end of the thin line.
  • The line should now show the estimated measurement!

 

For longer distances, or areas with visual obstructions in front of the end point (common with outdoor areas), you simply:

  • Open the app.
  • Point the camera down so that it directly faces the ground.
  • Touch the ‘+’ button on the screen to add the starting point of your measurement; a small dot should appear on the screen.
  • Start walking, keeping the camera facing the ground; a thin line should appear as you walk. Remember to move slowly and pay attention to where you’re walking, to avoid injury!
  • When you reach the end of your measurement, touch the ‘+’ button on the screen again to add the end point; a small dot should appear at the end of the thin line.
  • Turn around and face the camera back over the thin line you just paced out; the line should now have a tag with the estimated measurement!

 

And there you have it — four simple methods to get some rough site measurements in just a few minutes! You’re now on your way to getting a fencing quote and finally answering that question; how much does fencing actually cost?!

Written by Evelyn Kandris

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